Ban Foreign Music In Ghana

Top Ghanaian musician Ekow Micah is advocating the ban of foreign music being played on Ghana’s airwaves.

This is because he thinks foreign music is one of the major contributors to why most Ghanaian musicians are poor.

Ekow made the claim on Wednesday at the launching of the first ever Music Council of Ghana (MCG) at Ramada Resort, Coco Beach in Accra.

The MCG was founded to advance the interest of stakeholders in the country’s music industry. It is also to galvanise musicians’ contributions to the development of the country, whilst bringing unity, accountability and improving the lives of musicians.

Ekow is the president, with top musician Akosua Adjapong being the vice president.

‘Foreign music on radio must be banned because Ghana must benefit Ghanaians,’ told NEWS-ONE an exclusive interview after the ceremony.

The council was founded by some bona-fide members of the Musician Union of Ghana (MUSIGA) and some Ghanaian citizens. The rest of the members include Nana Ampadu, Reverend Daniel Asamoah-Larbi, Akosua Afum Gyan, Francisca Bannerman, Bernard Attigah, Linda Brefo and Amarh Pino.

Ekow said the primary aim of the council was to seek the interest of every musician and how the country could also benefit from the music industry. The council, he said, would petition government on various issues affecting stakeholders for support.

‘We can’t do everything alone and so we will meet other stakeholders in the industry, see their interest and get competent people on board and hit the ground running.’

The council, he said, would make sure ‘people who are heading the industry account for whatever they are doing for the poor musicians. These are some of the things that we will write our petitions on to His Excellency the president’.

Ekow said if government failed to listen to the council, it would be forced to organize musicians to hit the streets to demonstrate for their rights. But that, he added, would be the last resort. However, he said government had given its assurance to listen to the council.

Present at the ceremony was Hon. Alexander Asum-Ahensah, Minister of Chieftaincy and Cultural who represented President Mills.

He said, ‘Music is a potential revenue earner with many job creation opportunities but because of lack of focus and effective structures to enhance the development and promotion of our music, coupled with a divided front, potential investors with the ability to drive the industry are also shying away.’

Promising government support, he said, ‘It is therefore very crucial that our musicians close their ranks and work in the unity to address the challenges facing the industry, notably piracy as well as payment of royalties to owners and composers to bring sanity into the industry to attract investors.’

Source: News One

 

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